Filling in the blanks

Not posted for a while….feel bad so will share a reflection I had yesterday.

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I was walking the the beach yesterday morning with my family, the tide was out and at one point Mr M stopped to demonstrate to our children what happened to a stream (this was water from an overflow pipe but you get the gist) when you divert it…something to do with meanders and oxbow lakes…..he was always the geographer.  As I watched them as Mr J was making trenches in the sand and the water was rushing in, changing direction but still finding its goal.

Later that day we were talking – Hubby and wife stuff and we were getting to the nub of the issue when I had a moment of clarity drawing a similarity to that mornings events and what we were currently engaged in…I had asked a specific question – rather than carrying on talking, or giving what I thought was the answer …I simply waited…eventually Mr J filled the space and we diverted a little but got to our final goal.  

Now all that personal stuff doesn’t really belong on an HR blog…except to remind you that when dealing with people (in all sorts of conversations…but especially those tricky ones)  it is good not to forget about the power of silence.  Something will fill that space and more often than not it is key to getting to the nub of the issue or helping you reach your objective.

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2 responses to “Filling in the blanks

  1. I couldn’t agree more. Being aware of and employing silence is a crucial part of sales training for that reason. However it goes much. Further than that. In all communication, especially where you need to persuade or educate, the spaces you leave between words, phrases and statements are crucial to imparting the message. Comedians find this to be very true too. Incessant talkers are rarely persuasive (except by browbeating), and not funny either. Frank Carson, for example, appeared to be a very fast talker, but actually timed and managed the spaces between gags exceptionally well.
    Whether speaking casually, or presenting professionally, employing silence well is the very best way to communicate successfully.

  2. I couldn’t agree more. Being aware of, and employing silence well, is a crucial part of sales training for that reason. However it goes much further than that. In all communication, especially where you need to persuade or educate, the spaces you leave between words, phrases and statements are crucial to imparting the message. Comedians find this to be very true too. Incessant talkers are rarely persuasive (except by browbeating), and not funny either. Frank Carson, for example, appeared to be a very fast talker, but actually timed and managed the spaces between gags exceptionally well.
    Whether speaking casually, or presenting professionally, employing silence well is the very best way to communicate successfully.

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